Character Quickstart Generator

(Heavy WIP)

Are you stuck on what your first character should be? Are you trying to invent family members for your character, but don't have a face to their names? Have you bought or claimed a design from someone, and need a personality for your newest PC? The Character Quickstart Generator has been made to address all this and more.

You will need:

  • A d4 die
  • A d6 die
  • A d8 die
  • A d10 die
  • A d12 die
  • A d20 die
  • Something to mark down your results in, such as a notebook or a Wordpad document
  • If you don't have dice or paper on hand, you can find a virtual dice roller here and an online text editor here.

When you get to each section, roll the die or dice indicated and match your results to the lists provided. Feel free to roll or reroll as many times as you'd like, and either use all or some of the sections provided. This generator is meant to give you ideas to get a character started, not be taken as the end-all-be-all.

Table of Contents (hide)

  1.   1.  Species & Luperci Gene
    1.   1.1  Species:
    2.   1.2  Luperci Type:
    3.   1.3  Preferred Form
  2.   2.  Gender & Sexuality
    1.   2.1  Gender:
    2.   2.2  Sexuality:
  3.   3.  Age and Size
    1.   3.1  Age
    2.   3.2  Size
  4.   4.  Eye Color
  5.   5.  Coat Color and Markings
    1.   5.1  Solid Colors
    2.   5.2  Wild-Type Colors
    3.   5.3  Body Markings
    4.   5.4  Merle
    5.   5.5  Brindle
    6.   5.6  Tick & Roan
    7.   5.7  Markings
  6.   6.  Mental and Physical Complications
    1.   6.1  Physical Complications
  7.   7.  Personality
  8.   8.  Alignment

1.  Species & Luperci Gene

1.1  Species:

Roll 1d8 to determine the following:

  • 1-2: Wolf
  • 3-4: Coyote
  • 4-5: Dog
  • 5-6: Jackal
  • 7-8: Hybrid (roll twice to see your character's lineage, or leave blank to keep it a mystery)

1.2  Luperci Type:

Roll 1d6 to determine the following:

  • 1-2: Non-Luperci
  • 3-4: Luperci Ortus
  • 5-6: Luperci Verto

1.3  Preferred Form

Roll 1d8 to determine the following:

  • 1-2: No preferred form
  • 3-4: Lupus
  • 5-6: Secui
  • 7-8: Optime

2.  Gender & Sexuality

2.1  Gender:

Roll 1d4 to determine the following:

  • 1: Male
  • 2: Female
  • 3: Nonbinary
  • 4: Other (demi-boy/girl, genderfluid, neutrois, etc.)

2.2  Sexuality:

This portion of the generator uses the Kinsey Scale to help generate a sexuality for your character. Until I can get a small writeup done here, please follow the above link for more info.

Roll 1d8 to determine the following:

  • 1: Exclusively heterosexual
  • 2: Predominantly heterosexual, only incidentally homosexual
  • 3: Predominantly heterosexual, but more than incidentally homosexual
  • 4: Equally heterosexual and homosexual
  • 5: Predominantly homosexual, but more than incidentally heterosexual
  • 6: Predominantly homosexual, only incidentally heterosexual
  • 7: Exclusively homosexual
  • 8: No socio-sexual contacts or reactions

3.  Age and Size

3.1  Age

Player characters, unless they are characters born ICly on 'Souls, must be at least 6 months old when they join the game. Roll 1d12 to determine how old your character is, ranging from 1 to 12 years depending on the result of the die. Please keep in mind the human-age equivalents and the aging differences between Luperci and non-Luperci when you roll; an explanation of the differences can be found here.

If you need a month for your character to be born in, roll 1d12 and match your result to the following:

  • 1: January
  • 2: February
  • 3: March
  • 4: April
  • 5: May
  • 6: June
  • 7: July
  • 8: August
  • 9: September
  • 10: October
  • 11: November
  • 12: December

3.2  Size

This portion of the generator uses the size categories on the 'Souls RPG Guide as a general reference. If your roll result puts you in the "tiny" or "giant" category, immediately roll on the Tiny-Size or Giant-Size Complications' tables to determine a disability for your character. These categories reflect individuals with dwarfism and gigantism and the complications thereof, respectively.

Roll 1d10 to determine the following:

  • 1-2: Tiny
  • 3-4: Small
  • 5-6: Normal/Average
  • 7-8: Large
  • 9-10: Giant

Tiny-Size Complications

If you rolled "tiny" on the size chart, please roll to give your character one of the following complications associated with dwarfism:

  • 1-2: Small Limbs - One or more of your limbs is too short for your body. You might struggle above the ground on stubby legs, or your hind legs might drag because they're malformed. Movement is difficult, and performing certain tasks in Optime (such as using a too-small hand to hold an ax) are significantly more difficult.
  • 3-4: Difficult Movement - Your muscles or bones are underdeveloped or weaker than normal. You find it hard to move, and may suffer breaks and strains more easily than other Luperci. This can make hunting or keeping up with a pack more laborious and dangerous than usual.
  • 5-6: Reproductive Difficulties - You may be infertile or have a missed or delayed puberty. Children may be impossible for you to conceive without a surrogate. If your character has a womb, they're likely to lack the hip and muscle development that makes childbirth possible, to the point of risking death during the act.
  • 7-8: Joint and Nerve Issues - Your joints and nerves are affected by being born too small. Early-onset arthritis, scoliosis, and chronic pain are all possible conditions for a character to have. Shifting to each form may be uncomfortable to downright agonizing, and some might overuse or abuse substances in order to cope with the effects.
  • 9-10: Organ Dysfunction - Your body's too small for some of your organs or your organs are too big for your body. You may be short of breath and asthmatic from weak lungs, or struggle with endurance and blood pressure due to heart trouble. Individuals with this condition may not live very long, feeling the effects of age far sooner than most.

Giant-Size Complications

If you rolled "giant" on the size chart, please roll to give your character one of the following complications associated with gigantism:

  • 1-2: Joint and Nerve Issues - Your joints and nerves are affected by being born too big. Abnormal bone growth, scoliosis, and chronic pain are all possible conditions for a character to have. Shifting to each form may be uncomfortable to downright agonizing, and some might overuse or abuse substances in order to cope with the effects.
  • 3-4: Reduced Lifespan - It is a known fact that larger canines (such as Great Danes) do not have a long lifespan. For all intents and purposes, treat your character as being two years older than they actually are. In addition to this, your character is unlikely to live past ten.
  • 5-6: Lesser Endurance - The character's energy and endurance levels run out faster than most. Long periods of exertion are difficult, as are long-distance periods of running or moving quickly. As they have more body for their systems to maintain, they also require more food than other individuals.
  • 7-8: A World Too Small - The world isn't made for a character of your size. Doorframes, den holes, and other entrances might require ducking or maneuvering into, or are impossible to access entirely. Small buildings may be uncomfortably cramped, and smaller prey can easily slip through a hole not fit for the character. Horses and riding animals may also be unable to carry the character due to weight.
  • 9-10: Organ Dysfunction - Your body's too big for some of your organs or your organs are too big for your body. You may be short of breath and asthmatic from weak lungs, or struggle with endurance and blood pressure due to heart trouble. Individuals with this condition may not live very long, feeling the effects of age far sooner than most.

4.  Eye Color

Roll 1d10 and match your result to the following table:

  • 1: Brown
  • 2: Orange
  • 3: Yellow
  • 4: Green
  • 5: Blue
  • 6: Gray
  • 7: Red
  • 8: Purple
  • 9: Pink
  • 10: Your character is odd-eyed, having one eye that's differently-colored from the other. Roll twice, with the first result being the left eye and the second result being the right.

5.  Coat Color and Markings

This is not an exhaustive list of all the coat colors that exist for canines. Instead, it uses a canine color guide on 'Souls to create a simple way to come up with an appearance for your character, which you can customize and play around with later. A great website that goes more in-depth to dog color genetics is Dog Coat Colour Genetics.

To determine a coat color for your character, roll 1d10 and match your result to the following chart:

  • 1-2: Solid Colors
  • 3-4: Wild-Type Colors
  • 4-5: Body Markings
  • 6-7: Merle
  • 7-8: Tick & Roan
  • 9-10: Your character has a marking of some kind in addition to their base coat color. Roll a 1d8 to determine the base coat, and then go down to the Markings chart to see what marking your character has. Note that, if your character has a dark marking on dark coat or a light marking on a light coat, it may be hard to spot or not be seen at all.

Once you have rolled for the category of coat color your character will have, proceed to the charts to below to determine the specific color.

5.1  Solid Colors

Because of the number of solid colors listed on the RPG Guide's chart, they had to be broken up into two sets. Roll 1d4 and match your result to the following:

  • 1-2: Set One
  • 3-4: Set Two

Set One

Roll 1d8 to determine the following:

  • 1: Black
  • 2: White
  • 3: Gray
  • 4: Fawn
  • 5: Lilac/Isabella
  • 6: Red/Sable
  • 7: Red/Gold
  • 8: Cream

Set Two

Roll 1d6 to determine the following:

  • 1: Blue
  • 2: Chocolate
  • 3: Liver
  • 4: Yellow
  • 5: Seal
  • 6: Albino (white with pink skin and red, blue or purple eyes due to lack of pigment; technically not a realistic color in most dogs, but 'Souls permits albino canines)

5.2  Wild-Type Colors

Roll 1d6 to determine the following:

  • 1: Wolf-Type Agouti
  • 2: Coyote-Type Agouti
  • 3: Golden Jackal Colors
  • 4: Black-Backed Jackal Colors
  • 5: Side-Striped Jackal Colors
  • 6: Variant color morph. Your character is a melanistic (black- or dark-colored) or leucistic (light or near-white colored) version of one of the above wild-type colors. Pick which variant you prefer and roll a d10 to see what kind of melanistic or leucistic wild-type you end up with.

5.3  Body Markings

Roll 1d8 to determine the following:

  • 1: Sable Tricolor
  • 2: Red/Sable Tricolor
  • 3: Spotted Tricolor
  • 4: Liver Tricolor
  • 5: Black Tricolor
  • 6: Black & Tan
  • 7: Liver & White
  • 8: Liver & Tan

5.4  Merle

Due to the severe health complications associated with and to chart to map to a d12, double merle doesn't appear as an option on this table. Roll 1d12 to determine the following:

  • 1: Blue Merle
  • 2: Red/Sable Merle
  • 3: Lilac Merle
  • 4: Light Merle
  • 5: Tan & Red Merle
  • 6: Tweed Merle
  • 7: Tweed Merle
  • 8: Harlequin
  • 9: Sable Merle
  • 10: Liver Merle
  • 11: Blue Merle & Tan
  • 12: Agouti Merle

5.5  Brindle

Roll 1d10 to determine the following:

  • 1: Black Brindle
  • 2: Red Brindle
  • 3: Light Brindle
  • 4: Brindle
  • 5: Fawn Brindle
  • 6: Dark Brindle
  • 7: Liver Brindle
  • 8: Silver Brindle
  • 9: Brindle & White
  • 10: Brindle & Tan (body will appear solid, brindling will appear on tan points)

5.6  Tick & Roan

Roll 1d8 to determine the following:

  • 1: Bluetick
  • 2: Bluetick (Diluted)
  • 3: Redtick (Diluted)
  • 4: Redtick
  • 5: Black & Tan Tick
  • 6: Blue Roan
  • 7: Red Roan
  • 8: Liver Roan

5.7  Markings

If you rolled a 9 or 10 on the first Coat Color and Markings table, roll 1d12 to see what kind of marking your character has:

  • 1: Countershading
  • 2: Urajiro
  • 3: Nonself
  • 4: Dark Mask
  • 5: Reverse Mask (a pale-colored mask with dark lips and/or edges, as opposed to a dark mask)
  • 6: Saddle
  • 7: Minimal White
  • 8: Extreme White
  • 9: Irish-Spotted
  • 10: Piebald
  • 11: Extreme Piebald
  • 12: Spotted (resembling a Dalmatian or English Setter's usual coat colors)

6.  Mental and Physical Complications

6.1  Physical Complications

This section requires clean-up and rewriting. I'll post an updated table here soon.

7.  Personality

Though there are many personality systems that can be used to develop a character, I find the Enneagram of Personality maps nicely to a d10. The idea is that there are nine points of personality, each numbered as such and sometimes influenced by adjacent personality types. To determine your character's Enneagram type, roll 1d10 and consult the following chart:

  • 1: The Reformer - "Principled, Purposeful, Self-Controlled, and Perfectionistic"
  • 2: The Helper - "Demonstrative, Generous, People-Pleasing, and Possessive"
  • 3: The Achiever - "Adaptive, Excelling, Driven, and Image-Conscious"
  • 4: The Individualist - "Expressive, Dramatic, Self-Absorbed, and Temperamental"
  • 5: The Investigator - "Perceptive, Innovative, Secretive, and Isolated"
  • 6: The Loyalist - "Engaging, Responsible, Anxious, and Suspicious"
  • 7: The Enthusiast - "Spontaneous, Versatile, Distractible, and Scattered"
  • 8: The Challenger - "Self-Confident, Decisive, Willful, and Confrontational"
  • 9: The Peacemaker - "Receptive, Reassuring, Agreeable, and Complacent"
  • 10: In addition to the above, your character has a noticeable wing, which brings characteristics from an adjacent Enneagram type into your own. Roll to determine a base type, and then pick a type adjacent to the result to act as your character's wing. For example, a character with the Peacemaker type may have a Type 1 (Reformer) Wing or a Type 8 (Challenger) Wing.

An Enneagram type may also be described as having an instinctual variant, which refers to how they interact with the world around them in regards to their type. Roll 1d6 to determine your character's variant, if you so choose:

  • 1-2: Self-Preservation - Focuses on comfort and well-being of the self. Has a low energy level and stoic tendencies.
  • 3-4: Attraction - Also known as the sexual variant, though this is a bit misleading. This type focuses on intimate relationships and one-to-one contact with others, and can be temperamental and rule-breaking.
  • 5-6: Social - Focuses on being in a group and working as a team. Wants to fit in with the others and have some sort of status.

8.  Alignment

Originally a Dungeons & Dragons concept, alignment has become a popular, simplified way to explain a character's moral and ethical stances. It is defined by combining a character's view on order vs. chaos with their views on good vs. evil. Orderly characters respect tradition, law and authority; chaotic characters respect their conscience, free will, and new ideas. Good characters seek to protect life and the innocent; evil characters will debase and destroy them. An in-depth analysis and explanation of alignment and the variants thereof can be found at EasyDamus.

To determine your character's alignment, roll 1d10 and match your result to the following:

  • 1: Lawful Good - Does what a good person should or is expected to.
  • 2: Neutral Good - Does their best to do what a good person would do.
  • 3: Chaotic Good - Does whatever their conscience says is good.
  • 4: Lawful Neutral - Does what a code of conduct directs them to do.
  • 5: True Neutral - Does whatever seems to be wise to do.
  • 6: Chaotic Neutral - Does whatever they want.
  • 7: Lawful Evil - Does whatever they want without regard for others, but only within the boundaries of a certain code of conduct.
  • 8: Neutral Evil - Does whatever they can get away with.
  • 9: Chaotic Evil - Does whatever they want to satisfy their vices and/or a need for destruction, regardless of the consequences.
  • 10: Your character is on the border between or a mix of two alignment systems. Roll twice to get two different alignments, and then consider what makes your character lean toward one alignment or another.

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