Violet (Viola)

Table of Contents (hide)

  1.   1.  Types
    1.   1.1  Cultivars vs Wild
    2.   1.2  Marsh Violet (Viola palustris)
    3.   1.3  Canadian White Violet (Viola canadensis)
    4.   1.4  Heartsease (Viola tricolor)
  2.   2.  Obtaining
  3.   3.  Uses
    1.   3.1  Medicine
  4.   4.  More
  5.   5.  'Souls
Common Name Violet
Latin Name Mentha (genus)
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1.  Types

1.1  Cultivars vs Wild

A large number of garden and ornamental varieties were developed; "pansy" refers to those multi-coloured, large-flowered cultivars. The terms "viola" and "violet" are normally reserved for the small-flowered, including the species.

1.2  Marsh Violet (Viola palustris)

The small glabrous herb bears flowers that are white, with yellow bases and sometimes streaks of purple.

1.3  Canadian White Violet (Viola canadensis)

The small plant bears flowers that are white, with yellow bases and sometimes streaks of purple.

1.4  Heartsease (Viola tricolor)

A small plant of creeping habit, reaching at most 15 cm in height, with flowers purple, blue, yellow or white. It can be annual or a short-lived perennial. It is invasive, though naturalized to North America and 'souls territories.

2.  Obtaining

  • Extremely Common (wild growth): These plants are found across the territories.

3.  Uses

  • Dye: The flowers have also been used to make yellow, green and blue-green dyes.
  • Tea and flavoring: Distinct vanilla flavor with hints of wintergreen.
  • Scent: Violet is known to have a 'flirty' scent as its fragrance comes and goes.

3.1  Medicine

It has been recommended, among other uses, for respiratory issues, epilepsy, asthma, skin diseases and eczema. Extracts from the plant are anti-microbial.

4.  More

5.  'Souls

  • Something!
Categories: Flora | Resources