Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria)

Table of Contents (hide)

  1.   1.  Description
    1.   1.1  Growth
  2.   2.  Obtainment
  3.   3.  Uses
    1.   3.1  Medicine
  4.   4.  More
  5.   5.  'Souls
Common Name Meadowsweet, Queen of the Meadow, Pride of the Meadow, Meadow-Wort, Meadow Queen, Lady of the Meadow, Dollof, Meadsweet, and Bridewort.
Latin Name Filipendula ulmaria
Icon(s)
Meadowsweet (Filipendula ulmaria), Higher Marsh by geograph.org.uk (via. Wikimedia Commons)

1.  Description

The stems are 1–2 m (3–7 ft) tall, erect and furrowed, reddish to sometimes purple. The leaves are dark-green on the upper side and whitish and downy underneath, much divided, interruptedly pinnate, having a few large serrate leaflets and small intermediate ones. Terminal leaflets are large, 4–8 cm long, and three- to five-lobed.

Meadowsweet has delicate, graceful, creamy-white flowers clustered close together in handsome irregularly-branched cymes, having a very strong, sweet smell. They flower from June to early September.

1.1  Growth

Meadowsweet grows in damp meadows.

2.  Obtainment

Very Common. Though non-native, it has been naturalized in many regions of the world.
Packs: Vinátta had meadowsweet in their communal garden.[1], and may still grow in the region where the pack was founded. Salsola maintains a large supply in their garden as well. Casa di Cavalieri owns a small amount.

3.  Uses

  • Dye: a natural black dye can be obtained from the roots by using a copper mordant.
  • Scent disguise: Strong, sweet scent
    • As a strewing herb, strewn on floors to give rooms a pleasant aroma
  • Edible: the whole herb possesses a pleasant taste and flavour, subtly akin to almonds. The green parts have a similar aromatic character to the flowers.
    • Can be used to flavour wine, beer, and many vinegars -- a frequently used spice in varieties of mead.

3.1  Medicine

Can be used for a variety of anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial purposes due to presence of salicylic acid. Effective for fevers and inflammations, pain relief, ulcers and bacteriostatic. This is the plant aspirin was originally derived from. Teas, compresses, and all other manner of medical treatment can be derived from this plant.

4.  More

5.  'Souls

  • Hey, did your character do something cool with this plant?
  • Or maybe your pack has it for trade?
Categories: Flora | Resources