Beaver (Castor canadensis)

Table of Contents (hide)

  1.   1.  Description
  2.   2.  Speech
  3.   3.  Uses
  4.   4.  More
  5.   5.  'Souls
Latin Castor canadensis
Icon(s) Beaver Beaver Beaver

1.  Description

Adults usually weigh from 11 to 32 kg (24 to 71 lb), with 20 kg (44 lb) being a typical mass. The head-and-body length is 74–90 cm (29–35 in), with the tail adding a further 20–35 cm (7.9–14 in). Very old individuals can exceptionally exceed normal sizes, weighing more than 40 kg (88 lb) or even as much as 50 kg (110 lb).

The beaver is semi-aquatic. The beaver has many traits suited to this lifestyle. It has a large flat paddle-shaped tail and large, webbed hind feet reminiscent of a human diver's swimfins. The unwebbed front paws are smaller, with claws. The eyes are covered by a nictitating membrane which allows the beaver to see underwater. The nostrils and ears are sealed while submerged. A thick layer of fat under its skin insulates the beaver from its cold water environment.

Beavers are most famous, and infamous, for their dam-building. They maintain their pond-habitat by reacting quickly to the sound of running water, and damming it up with tree branches and mud. Early ecologists believed that this dam-building was an amazing feat of architectural planning, indicative of the beaver's high intellect.

2.  Speech

According to our Speech Guide, this creature speaks Low Speech naturally. It is therefore not able to communicate with Luperci. This creature is listed as having the ability to learn some limited comprehension of high speech, but generally will never be able to speak it.

3.  Uses

  • Meat: Beaver meat is similar tasting to lean beef, but care must be taken to prevent contamination from the animal's strong castor (musk) gland. It is usually slow-cooked in a broth.

4.  More

5.  'Souls

  • Something!
Categories: Fauna | Resources