Del Cenere Gang Territory

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  • Palisade is Del Cenere's off-board outpost, located just west of Portland.

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Table of Contents (hide)

  1.   1.  Introduction
  2.   2.  Quick Maps
  3.   3.  Subterritories

1.  Introduction

Wrapped snug around the northern point of Moosehead Lake, Del Cenere's lush territories are varied by the rims of foothills and mountains, of marshes and floodplains. Secure, and peppered with old and rotted symbols of civilization past, the Gang now stakes its claim in the hollowed shells of what was. At its southern point, the heart of Del Cenere thrums in the form of a bustling trade post called Charmingtown, cradled in the hold of the Burnt Church Mountain range.

2.  Quick Maps

3.  Subterritories

El Tramo

Silverado Field

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flora & fauna

Territory Credit: Westy

An expansive stretch of grassland and sparse copses of trees atop Sweetwater Bluff, broken up by rolling hills - it creates a stark border between El Tramo and Tall Tree. Springtime hits fast, with a burst of silver and green grasses competing amidst colorful bursts of wildflowers that slowly fade out through the summer as the land dries. Come fall, the grasses are baked out to golden waves.

Old, time-rotten fences mark out property lines of long-forgotten pastures, though the plain still remains a favorite of free-roaming horses.

Come evening, the fields come alive with the buzzing of insect wings, and abundant deer creeping from the treelines to feed on the fresh greenery.

Flora


sickle-fruited fenugreek, red clover, white clover, rabbit foot clover, zig-zag clover, hop trefoil, lesser hop trefoil, sickle alfalfa, alfalfa, tall melilot, white sweetclover, purple crownvetch, bird's-foot trefoil, sundial lupine, nootka lupine, dyer's greenweed, common broom, field milkwort, wild strawberry, salad burnet, great burnet, dwarf raspberry, redshank, virginia spiderwort, various grasses

Fauna


white-tailed deer, star-nosed mole, eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red fox, raccoon, striped skunk

Sweetwater Bluff

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A fault line cliff face, butted up around the northwestern point of Moosehead Lake, with jagged and crumbling edges washed in all manner of moss to soften their effect. The bottom of the bluffs are filled with pockets of water, shallow pools that shift with the seasons, along with the fish and small fry that comprise the ponds' ecosystems. The beaches are rough, and rocky, but the fishing along Moosehead Lake is good come summer mornings and late afternoons.

The ample number of pine and spruce, and marshy pools make this ideal moose territory in summer.

Winter brings piles of snow drifts, and blustering winds, where the spring thaw brings marshy earth beneath the stone and water flowing off the faces of the cliffs, forming all manner of small, trickling falls to feed Del Cenere's tributaries.

Flora


bird's-foot trefoil, nootka lupine, dyer's greenweed, common broom, salad burnet, dwarf raspberry, lowbush blueberry, virginia spiderwort, northern adder's tongue, wood horsetail, shady horsetail, lanceleaf moonwort, leathery grapefern, northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, prickly hornwort, duckweed, black cohosh, yarrow, cranberry

Fauna


white-tailed deer, star-nosed mole, eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red fox, raccoon, beaver, moose

The Three Sisters

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Territory Credit: Jace

Three northern tributaries flow into Moosehead Lake, giving the north end of the lake a small southerly flowing current. Before emptying into Moosehead lake, all three of these rivers throw themselves from cliffs roughly twenty feet tall to shatter against the rocks below, then commencing their path into the lake. These rivers mark the blurred region border between Tall Tree and El Tramo, with each river leading to a specific fall and acting as a guideline staple to Del Cenere's maps.

  • The Western Tributary, Little Sister, named thus for she is the shortest and smallest of her siblings.
  • The Northern Tributary, Broken Sister, for as she is traveled upstream she breaks into two.
  • The Eastern Tributary, Sunrise Sister, for she begins in the direction of the rising sun and on cloudless mornings, her waters ripple with its rays like fire.

Come fall, as the world tips on its axis, the sunsets hit the falls at a prime angle, lighting all of the falls up in a glowing orange for all of fifteen minutes as the light starts to die.

Flora


leathery grapefern, northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, prickly hornwort, honey locust, American groundnut, hairy tare, bristly locust, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, common silverweed, tall hairy agrimony, wood avens, dewdrop, smooth blackberry, dropwort, meadowsweet, witch hazel

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red fox, short-tailed weasel, porcupine, red squirrel

The Parish

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A stretch of land lays, quiet and for the most part, untouched, nestled between Silverado Fields and the rocky, craggy bluffs - the woods surrounding the All-Saints Church make the land seem ageless, and unchanging, save for the persistent sound of rushing, crashing waters of the nearby Sisters and their rivers. The landscape forms near-tiered steps, eroded away, and the knolls provide ample cover and protection for free-range horses. Birds frequent the church's old belfry-turned-rookery. Del Cenere's faithful dead often find their final resting place among the graveyards of The Parish.

  • For more detailed information, check out The Parish.

Flora


common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, prickly hornwort, honey locust, American groundnut, hairy tare, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, common silverweed, wood avens, dewdrop, smooth blackberry, dropwort, meadowsweet

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red squirrel, snowshoe hare

Cabeza de Alce

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Territory Credit: Salena

Once a thriving port that still offers access to the open waters, many of the ones strong buildings have succumbed to the passage of time. What remains is a shell of this once great port. Many of the houses have been destroyed and stone buildings are but ruins. Even so, a couple of the structures on the edge of the waters remain standing, as do the docks. Though in need of some small repairs, this port can still house boats to be cast off the shore and held here until intended use.

The gravel and sand shore is still mostly barren, cleared years ago, and any trees that have managed to spring up through patches of once-asphalt are young and green and oftentimes trimmed down by passing moose or stripped by deer on their way to richer portions of the territory. However, with all the collapsed buildings, and all the hidden nooks and crannies that the debris provides, the area is heaving with small prey.

Flora


northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, prickly hornwort, honey locust, American groundnut, hairy tare, bristly locust, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, common silverweed, dewdrop, smooth blackberry, dropwort, meadowsweet

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, short-tailed weasel, snowshoe hare

Broke-Leg Marsh

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The sweeping lowlands of Del Cenere's territory stretches into the Canaan Bog - lending to marshes that are both sparsely forested and dense with bog-resilient trees, and barren pines that once thrived in the area. The earth is unsteady and thick, muddy and cloying as it sinks beneath stagnant waters, both a culmination of run-off from Moosehead Lake, and beaver dams. Few creatures, save for hardy beasts, small vermin, and waterfowl linger in the aptly-named swamps. The landscape is lush, overgrown, and indescribably private.

Further north from the bog, and eastwards towards Moosehead Lake, there's a stretch of floodplain that dries during the summer that serves as a free-roam pasture known to the locals as Tierra Amplia, where the grass is tall enough to hide the fawns of white-tailed deer in the late spring.

Flora


meadowsweet, flowering-rush, common arrowgrass, marsh arrowgrass, cinnamon-spot pondweed, American groundnut, duckweed, queen of the prairie, small-flowered sweet-briar, water horsetail, red chokeberry, black chokeberry, rowan, rough hawthorn, wild crab apple, blackthorn, alder buckthorn, stinging nettle, field elm, bog wintergreen, marsh labrador tea, leatherleaf, northern dwarf huckleberry, great sundew, pale bog-moss, eel-grass, common waterweed, common grape hyacinth, red trillium, black cohosh

Fauna


deer mouse, beaver, moose, white-tailed deer

Tall Tree

Ol' 108

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Territory Credit: Jace

In 1957, Highway 108 was laid down and served to connect the Trans-Canada Highway with the mines in the Elliot Lake and Quirke Lake area. No longer do cars, carts and trucks travel along the broken asphalt. This vast expanse of blacktop is still yet a highway for nature. Weaving through the overgrown forests, it provides a pathway for many woodland creatures. Nature has sought to reclaim much of this covered land, blanketing sections of its back with foliage and downed trees, but Old 108 lives on, for now.

The blacktop stretches and loops, marking out a definitive border at Del Cenere's northeastern border, and also features a long-since-forgotten gas station, before the road and its railings are swallowed up by the dark forests surrounding it. The road re-emerges, only in the form of debris across a short overpass that has since collapsed into a small ravine, gouged by a dried up riverbed.

Flora


leathery grapefern, northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, American groundnut, hairy tare, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, common silverweed, wood avens, dewdrop, red trillium, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, sugar maple, gray birch, ironwood, American mountain ash, tamarack, balsam fir, black ash, black willow

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red fox, raccoon, striped skunk, red squirrel, bobcat, white-tailed deer, cougar, porcupine

Poco Sueño

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Territory Credit: Jace

This crack in the earth was caused by an earthquake long ago. Poco Sueño is inherently dangerous in that it does not appear dangerous. Only two feet wide and approximately thirty feet long, the gouge is perfectly jump-able for the average Luperci, but be wary you do not trip and fall. Beneath the surface Poco Sueño extends almost a half kilometer into the ground, a single misstep will spell fatality.

This natural fissure opens up south of the Old 108, and north of the Devil's Kettle, potentially outlining a fault in the earth.

Flora


leathery grapefern, northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, American groundnut, hairy tare, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, common silverweed, wood avens, dewdrop, red trillium, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, sugar maple, gray birch, ironwood, American mountain ash, tamarack, balsam fir, black ash, black willow

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red fox, raccoon, striped skunk, red squirrel, bobcat, white-tailed deer, porcupine, little brown bat, snowshoe hare

Devil's Kettle

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Territory Credit: Shannah

Sharing the name of a similar phenomenon in the States, a river off of Moosehead Lake empties over a waterfall into a pothole -- with no bottom. Experiments have been done to see where the water goes, but all that's certain is that when something goes in there, it never comes out. Some say it goes all the way down to Hell itself. Regardless, it's a point of interest... and a point of caution.

The Devil's Kettle's roar can be heard from a sizable distance - and has carved deep into the black and red stone, with water just as black. The current of the visible channels of water look deceptively slow, and the bottomless pools pock the landscape in various spots trailing towards Bushtail Well, and Moosehead Lake. Forests around the Kettle are thick, a mixture of bristling pines and lush deciduous that blush gold and red come fall.

Flora


leathery grapefern, northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, American groundnut, hairy tare, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, common silverweed, wood avens, dewdrop, red trillium, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, sugar maple, gray birch, ironwood, American mountain ash, tamarack

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red fox, raccoon, striped skunk, red squirrel, bobcat

Widowfall Spring

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During the earthquake of Spring 2020, hidden springs and water built pressure from beneath the earth, south of the Devil's Kettle but north of Bushtail Well, overflowed and burst under the seismic strain. Rock crumbled away, still jagged and largely uneasy, to expose the pot-hole springs within the rolling hills.

What remained in the wreckage were numerous pools, surrounded by arching, sweeping rock, carved out over years of erosion, all of varying depth and temperature. Caution is advised whilst traversing these - water still sinks under overhangs, and some of the seemingly bottomless pools have a downward pulling current, without guarantee of resurfacing.

Flora


leathery grapefern, northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, American groundnut, hairy tare, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, common silverweed, wood avens, dewdrop, red trillium, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, sugar maple, gray birch, ironwood, American mountain ash, tamarack

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red fox, raccoon, striped skunk, red squirrel, bobcat

Bushtail Well

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flora & fauna

Territory Credit: Nat

A natural well, deep and clear, opens up to feed the creeks flowing to Moosehead Lake. The main pool is 50 feet deep, and bubbles filter up gently from the fresh water spring at its base. Adjacent to the main well, a smaller pool sports gentle slopes into a center not deep enough to completely cover a standing Luperci. Depending on the time of day, it is either enveloped in full sunlight, or, shaded by the hovering tree tops. It is a fantastic place to cool off in the summer heat. But beware to those curious enough to try to explore the underwater cave systems of the main well; twisting, rocky tunnels may or may not lead back to the surface.

Flora


leathery grapefern, northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, prickly hornwort, honey locust, American groundnut, hairy tare, bristly locust, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, common silverweed, wood avens, dewdrop, dropwort, meadowsweet, red trillium, woodland rush, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, sugar maple, gray birch, ironwood

Fauna


white-tailed deer, eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red fox, raccoon, striped skunk, red squirrel

The Angel Oak

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Long ago, when the sapling was still young, an old bull moose collapsed on its form, and passed away, and while the oak grew, and grew, and grew, it displaced its pieces, entwining and devouring bits of bone and leaving a half-swallowed moose skull wrapped in its large, sprawling branches. Even to the godless, the Angel Oak is awe inspiring by its sheer grandeur, its boughs growing gnarled and old enough to droop down to kiss the earth before bending back up again, pushing the other trees back from its claim. It now stands as a testament to time, and a gathering place for the folks of Del Cenere.

At its grand, gnarled roots stands a stone plinth, often placed before feasting tables of this wall-less dining hall, where the Rey Salvaje stands to summon the Gang.

Flora


leathery grapefern, northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, prickly hornwort, honey locust, American groundnut, hairy tare, bristly locust, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, common silverweed, wood avens, dewdrop, dropwort, meadowsweet, red trillium, woodland rush, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, sugar maple, gray birch, ironwood, American mountain ash, tamarack, balsam fir, black ash, black willow

Fauna


white-tailed deer, eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red fox, raccoon, striped skunk, red squirrel

Lover's Leap

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flora & fauna

Territory Credit: Temo

A cliff-face at the edge of Moosehead Lake sat picturesque amidst the forest and lake. To the south, one can look down upon the lake, and to the north, watch the Three Sisters spill into the vast, glassy surface of the waters. Come fall, it's the perfect place to come witness the falls light up like fire before the night settles in - romantic as ever, new and established couples alike come to the top of the cliff to partake of the views as well as spend time together to build upon their relationship or to strengthen a bond.

It is said that a long time ago, a couple that were not allowed to be together by their parents used to steal away at night to secretly meet there. After several years, the secret love was discovered and instead of a lifelong forced separation, together, hand in hand, they both jumped to their deaths upon the rocks below. If one were to listen, especially on a moonlit night with wisps of mist floating through the trees, you may hear the mournful wails as the ghosts of the two lovers look for each other among the trees. Some have also claimed to have seen the ghosts wandering the cliffs.

Flora


leathery grapefern, northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, prickly hornwort, honey locust, American groundnut, hairy tare, bristly locust, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, common silverweed, wood avens, dewdrop, dropwort, meadowsweet, red trillium, woodland rush, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, sugar maple, gray birch, ironwood, American mountain ash, tamarack, balsam fir, black ash, black willow

Fauna


white-tailed deer, eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red fox, raccoon, striped skunk, red squirrel

Trailside

Irving

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flora & fauna

Territory Credit: Dark

It is a wide expanse of broken concrete and a single strip of tarmac. To the right of the town, a nursery that supplied the sawmill sits overgrown and unused, but within the growth are several damaged and run-down greenhouses and sectioned fields separated by black gravel.

The greenhouses have long since lost their useful paneling of plexi-glass - the surviving panels have bowed severely, or clouded, or cracked, and the rest seems to be gone completely, leaving the skeletal framework of the buildings that once were. In the center of the town are small cabins, once for the workers of the mill and nursery, but now making a nice grid of small to medium houses that could use a little TLC. Outside of the town, there is a crash site for an old Avenger Spray plane from 1958 tangled in the overgrowth with bits of metal and scrap strewn about.

Flora


northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, American groundnut, hairy tare, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, common silverweed, wood avens, dewdrop, red trillium, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, sugar maple, gray birch, ironwood, American mountain ash, tamarack, balsam fir, black ash, black willow

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, red fox, raccoon, striped skunk, red squirrel, bobcat, white-tailed deer, porcupine

Debouille Reserve

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Territory Credit: Dark

A Land reserve with a trail winding up the mountain and three ponds; Deboullie, Black and Gardner. Deboullie is larger, and Black and Gardner are on either side and are smaller. The ponds have very few shores, mostly riddled with rocks where fish take up residence, such as Brown, Speckled, Brook and Rainbow Trout and the American Eel. On the trail, there is a large stone work of steps leading to a small wooden shack and further on to the western summit and out of the Land Reserve.

Butted up against the mountains is an abandoned mining outpost, and a building known as the Drunk Tank - a warehouse turned makeshift prison somewhere down its long history. This building has long fallen into disrepair, the east wing has almost completely collapsed, taking much of the former roof along with it. The northern watchtower still stands, barely. A curious coyote would be well advised to watch their steps, as much of the wooden infrastructure is rotten with age and water damage. The prison encompasses several floors of stone walled rooms, and barred cells, along with a basement that is long flooded with water from broken pipes and seepage from the nearby bogs. Much of the internal structures have also suffered with age and neglect, many of the cell doors no longer swing freely, having rusted to uselessness long ago. A few cells remain usable, but where are the keys to lock them shut?

  • Territory Credit: Jace

Flora


northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, American groundnut, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, gray birch, ironwood, American mountain ash, black ash, yarrow

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, raccoon, red squirrel, white-tailed deer, porcupine

Charmingtown

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flora & fauna

The only place open to outsiders within Del Cenere, Charmingtown is a bustling little settlement, built on the bones of a long-dead homestead. Any fields have been overtaken by forests, the old barn that stood has been halfway overgrown with ivy, and the fence is falling in places, but the old buildings are still sound, the worst of their collapsing over with for the most part. Left behind are their foundations, or the shells of those that couldn’t stand up to the elements, now refashioned into stalls for barter, or workshops, and the old water tower, long dry, now stands to overlook it all.

In the trade post's heart lies The Ugly Coyote, a bar and tavern that thrums with activity both with the activity of Outsiders and Del Cenerens alike.

Flora


northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, gray birch, American mountain ash, black ash, choke cherry

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, raccoon, red squirrel, snowshoe hare

Ojo del Diablo

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flora & fauna

An odd but timeless rock feature, jutting up from the highest point of one of the hills overlooking Moosehead Lake. The stones look balanced, almost precariously so. They’ve been worn from wind, and time, and there’s a gap between their shapes, an almost perfect slot, that gazes out towards the horizon at dawn, or, perhaps more directly, casts its shadow and gaze out towards the Isla de los Ojos.

Flora


northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern white cedar, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, gray birch, American mountain ash, black ash, choke cherry

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, raccoon, red squirrel, white-tailed deer, snowshoe hare

Isla de los Ojos

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flora & fauna

Territory Credit: Dark, Jace, Salena

Secluded on the island just off the coast of the Charmingtown, this island's manor now lays in ruins from time and decay. But then again, not everything that dies in the world wishes to remain dead. Otherworldly forces have their eyes all over the place. When the low hanging fog covers the lake, sometimes, the eyes can be seen glowing in the wind. Only those brave enough, or stupid enough, to venture over would have the constant feeling of being watched, giving the island it's proper name.

Flora


northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, eastern hemlock, three-toothed cinquefoil, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, gray birch, American mountain ash, black ash

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, raccoon

La Caída

Deadwood

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flora & fauna

Game is scarce in the aptly named Deadwood. Nestled into a small valley within the Burnt Church Mountains, this is a forest with no canopy, and a sun-scorched floor. It's a healed fire - sparked long ago by a lightning strike, and the skeletal trees are stripped of all their bark. Snow drifts deep in the winter, and spring brings with it a messy, marshy run off, all pooled within the forest's basin, and while the plants are well-watered and fed by a warm early summer sun, most dies off by the height of the season, or dies at fall's freeze. The treacherous footing makes Deadwood a challenge to traverse, full of hidden holes and pits and crannies and roots. Deer rarely travel here, save for springtime.

Flora


northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, American groundnut, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, raccoon, red squirrel, white-tailed deer, snowshoe hare

Grizzly's Rest

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flora & fauna

Peaks climb high, reaching ever skyward, in the Burnt Church Mountains, until they start to level out. The rocky terrain is pleasant, quiet, forested, and dense with game both big and small.

Winters are brutal, but the summers pleasant - Grizzly's Rest is a perfect bowl in the mountain range - sheltered from harsh sun and wind, and most ill weather for much of the year. Grasses grow tall, and perfectly hides fawns, burrows - but also harbors a good deal of ticks, among other things.

Flora


northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, American groundnut, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, white spruce, red spruce, gray birch, ironwood, American mountain ash, tamarack, balsam fir, black ash, black willow

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, raccoon, red squirrel, white-tailed deer, snowshoe hare, red fox, moose

Pious Gorge

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flora & fauna

Pious Gorge is a long, winding gouge carved through the mountain range, twisting but beautiful, rocky and wild. It holds a great deal of secrets among the snaking trails; Plenty of places to hide sit among crannies, nooks, pock-marked tiny caves. Best of all, its walls get high enough that there only seems to be one way in- one way out, opening up into dusty, rolling foothills.

Flora


northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, American groundnut, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, white spruce, red spruce, gray birch, ironwood, American mountain ash, tamarack, balsam fir, black ash, black willow

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, raccoon, red squirrel, white-tailed deer, snowshoe hare, red fox

Clergy's Claim

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flora & fauna

This mine has sat, long abandoned, quiet, dusty - a cave in somewhere deep into its shaft has left a small crack to the surface, some far way up; Because of this, windy days sound forlorn, and haunting, thanks to the low, whistling howls and moans that echo off the narrow walls and wooden beams, calling out to Pious Gorge's indifferent inclines. Perhaps it's the mournful tune, or the soft creaks, the crackling sounds dust falling of ledges, but most animals steer clear.

However, as with most caves, the mine is pleasant and consistent in temperature. It's a shame the ceilings get a little short in areas, seemingly where it's darkest.

An old empty offshoot pours into a dark, forlorn room, with a rotten, wooden cross, and collapsed, long-abandoned pews.

Flora


common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia

Fauna


deer mouse, red fox

Hanging Lake

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description

flora & fauna

A long, winding hiking trail through the Pious Gorge, snugly following various creeks up the curve of the canyon eventually deposits travelers at a serene pool of temperate, blue water, still and ringed with trickling waterfalls that swell in the spring run off. Seemingly perfect, pristine - the water is clear through to the bottom, making its depth almost deceiving and looking much shallower than it truly is. The lake is a popular spot come summer, for those willing to traverse the achingly steep paths.

Flora


northern oak fern, common bracken, maidenhair spleenwort, alpine woodsia, northern whitecedar, red pine, scots pine, eastern hemlock, white spruce, red spruce, black spruce, American groundnut, boreal lady's-mantle, three-toothed cinquefoil, slender cottongrass, northern witchgrass, white spruce, red spruce, gray birch, ironwood, American mountain ash, tamarack, balsam fir, black ash, black willow

Fauna


eastern chipmunk, deer mouse, raccoon, red squirrel, white-tailed deer, snowshoe hare, red fox, moose

Category: Del Cenere Gang